Sir Max Beerbohm (1872–1956, British), created and published caricatures of the famous men of his own time and earlier. His style of single-figure caricatures in formalized groupings was established by
1896 and flourished until about 1930. His published works include Caricatures of Twenty-five Gentlemen (1896), The Poets' Corner (1904), and Rossetti and His Circle (1922). He published widely in
fashionable magazines of the time, and his works were exhibited regularly in London at the Carfax Gallery (1901–18) and Leicester Galleries (1911–57).
 

George Cruikshank (1792–1878, British) created political prints that attacked the royal family and leading politicians (in 1820 he received a royal bribe of £100 for a pledge "not to caricature His Majesty
(George III of the United Kingdom) in any immoral situation."[citation needed] He went on to create social caricatures of British life for popular publications such as The Comic Almanack (1835–1853) and
Omnibus (1842). Cruikshanks' New Union Club of 1819 is notable in the context of slavery.[6] He also earned fame as a book illustrator for Charles Dickens and many other authors.

Honoré Daumier (1808–1879, French) is considered by some[who?] to be the father of caricature.[citation needed] During his life, he created over 4,000 lithographs, most of them caricatures on political,
social, and everyday themes. They were published in the daily French newspapers (Le Charivari, La Caricature etc.)